Why is it important to Spay or Neuter Your Cat

When it comes to spaying The average lifespan of a neutered/spayed pet is 40% longer than that of an unneutered/unspayed one. Unspayed females can develop breast cancer or severe uterine infections by the time they are 8-10 years of age. Unspayed female cats also are in heat frequently, about every 3 weeks, during which time they are noisy and troublesome to live with. Worst of all, millions of unwanted kittens are euthanized in this country every year because there aren’t enough homes for them all.

Unneutered male cats over the age of 9 months have very strong-smelling urine, which they like to spray in the house to mark their territory. They are also prone to wander in search of female cats and are also very territorial. These traits lead to high rates of death from being hit by cars, fight wounds, and exposure to deadly contagious viral infections. Male cats are also, of course, equally responsible for pet overpopulation. 

We Recommend Spaying or Neutering Your Cat at 6 Months of Age

We recommend spaying (surgical removal of the ovaries and uterus) of female cats, and castration (surgical removal of the testicles) of males, for all pets that will not be used for purebred breeding. This should be done when your animal reaches 6 months of age. (Male cats can be neutered earlier while they are being declawed.) Your animal will be a healthier, happier pet, and you will have done your part to reduce the pet overpopulation problem. While your pet is anesthetized we can also remove any retained baby teeth and implant a microchip ID. This is a helpful way to identify your pet should he or she become lost or stolen.

Microchipping You Cat

While your pet is anesthetized we can also remove any retained baby teeth and implant a microchip ID. This is a helpful way to identify your pet should he or she become lost or stolen.